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A man sits in a white kitchen reading a brochure on the costs of getting dentures, while drinking coffee and having breakfast.

Denture-Related Costs

4 minutes to read

Posted: Jun 10, 2021

Getting dentures can be an intimidating process. The American College of Prosthodontists (ACP) answers the most popular questions regarding denture costs. 

How much do dentures cost? 

Answer: That is a really good question that has a range of answers. The cost of dentures is dependent upon the conditions within your mouth, the types of materials being used, the techniques used by the dentist or prosthodontist, as well as the location and general operating costs of the dental office. Denture care is an ongoing service to maintain a healthy mouth. What many patients don't realize is that there is a service aspect connected to complete denture care, which includes modification of dentures over time to eliminate "sore spots" or to improve how the teeth fit for chewing, and correcting the look of or adjusting the dentures to make them more comfortable and stable. The conditions of your mouth make your treatment easier or harder and therefore may result in different costs. If cost is your primary concern, you might want to locate a dental school in your community for treatment. Keep in mind, low-cost treatment is of limited value if you have to have the treatment done over again in a short time. To locate a prosthodontist near you, visit www.gotoapro.org.  

Response provided by the American College of Prosthodontists. 

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I have both upper and lower dentures, but the uppers, which are newer, are very white compared to the bottoms. It will cost me a lot (like $500) to replace them, but I want them to match. Can I whiten my dentures? 

Answer: It is not possible to whiten dentures like natural teeth because dentures are made of plastic. To minimize staining, properly clean your dentures daily to remove food and plaque bacteria. Brushing with a denture brush or soft toothbrush will prevent dentures from becoming permanently stained and will keep your mouth healthy. Moisten the brush and apply a nonabrasive denture paste (regular toothpaste is too abrasive) or use liquid soap. Brush every surface, inside and out, scrubbing gently. A variety of over-the-counter denture-cleanser products may be safely used (by following the manufacturer’s instructions) to remove some stains. You may also consider soaking your dentures in a cup of water with a teaspoon of household bleach, but be sure to rinse them off well before putting them back in your mouth. When cleaning your dentures, be careful not to drop them as they can break. You should clean your dentures over a sink that is filled with water or has a washcloth in place to prevent the dentures from breaking should you drop them while cleaning. More stubborn stains may require removal by your dentist or prosthodontist, a specialist in denture care and maintenance. To locate a prosthodontist near you, visit www.gotoapro.org

Response provided by the American College of Prosthodontists. 

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Recently, I have been breaking and losing my teeth. I had partials, but I have never had dentures, and my husband is encouraging me to finally get them. What is the cost if I have no insurance, and how long does it take for the teeth to be removed and replaced with dentures? 

Answer: Denture fees vary widely based on location. The best way to determine fees for service is to visit with your dentist or prosthodontist and discuss the care you may need. You may also contact your state or local dental society to find out if the organization has any resources for the public related to the cost of dental services. You may want to seek the care of a prosthodontist, a dentist with three years of training beyond dental school who specializes in the care and maintenance of dentures. To locate a prosthodontist near you, visit www.gotoapro.org. Temporary dentures can be placed the same day as your teeth are removed. Remember that once the teeth are gone, the jaws begin to shrink. Although this shrinkage is dramatic for the first six months and then slows down, you must remember that it is an ongoing, long-term concern for denture wearers and affects the fit of the dentures during the years. Temporary dentures will help your mouth look normal, but after wearing the temporary dentures for six months, they will need to be remade or relined. It is important that you continue to have the fit of your dentures evaluated on a regular basis and remade as needed to maintain their function and appearance. 

Response provided by the American College of Prosthodontists. 

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I am missing almost all of my upper teeth and am considering full dentures. What are the costs for extraction and for the dentures? Also, what is the timeframe for ordering and wearing the new dentures after extraction? 

Answer: The fee for removing your remaining teeth varies upon the complexity of the procedure required to remove your teeth as well as your geographic location. Some dental schools, including hospital-based programs, may offer reduced fees if you use a resident (a dentist in training for additional skills) or a dental student to perform the procedure (under the supervision of licensed dentists). The timing of the placement of the dentures can vary widely. Dentures may be made prior to the removal of the remaining teeth and may be inserted the day the teeth are extracted, or the teeth may be removed and healing allowed to take place before the dentures are delivered several weeks or even months later. Most patients want to have dentures sooner rather than later, but dentures placed soon after or immediately after teeth have been extracted may need to be adjusted or replaced after the healing process is finished. 

Response provided by the American College of Prosthodontists. 

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I bought a full upper denture and within months, they were way too loose. I was told by my dentist they would need relining after several months. My dentist now wants $475 to reline and fit these very thin dentures, but she never mentioned I would be charged to have these refitted. After paying $2,500 total (and unexpectedly), I was just wondering Is this the norm? Or was I just unlucky? 

Answer: Whenever teeth are extracted, the jawbone and gums in the areas where the teeth used to be start to shrink. This shrinkage can continue for the rest of your life, and this is part of the reason that most dentures need to be refit periodically. Because the most rapid jaw shrinkage occurs during the first six months after extractions, it would be quite normal for your dentures to be loose after six months and require relining. Because the need for this additional and continual treatment (refitting) can vary greatly from patient to patient and time to time, it is most often considered as a separate part of your treatment plan, and the time necessary to accomplish this service is billed accordingly. 

Response provided by the American College of Prosthodontists. 

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My lower dentures broke in half. What is the cost to repair my dentures? 

Answer: Dental procedures and costs vary widely based on many factors such as difficulty and the condition of your dentures as well as your bone and gums. The best way to determine fees for service is to visit with your dentist or prosthodontist and discuss the care you may need. The best solution is to return to the dentist or prosthodontist who made your dentures and have the broken denture repaired professionally. It may seem easy to fix, but it is important that the repair is done correctly to prevent problems with chewing and to avoid any sore spots. The doctor also needs to check the denture and adjust it after it’s repaired. There is also a chance that the denture is too old and no longer fit closely to your gums, and you may need a new one. To find a dentist who is a specialist who has extra training in making dentures, visit www.gotoapro.org

Response provided by the American College of Prosthodontists. 

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