Sign up forFixodent Club
A couple in their 30s are sleeping soundly, as they know that their dentures need a rest at night after being held in place all day by Fixodent.

Wearing Dentures at Night

2 minutes to read

Posted: Jul 16, 2021

Sleeping with dentures is probably one of the first topics a new denture wearer will ask about, and even veteran denture wearers will still have questions about it. Here is what the American College of Prosthodontists has to say on the subject.

I just got a full set of dentures. It’s only been a few days, but is it normal for my tongue and gums to still be so sore? Also, when can I start taking out my dentures at night?

Answer: Yes, it should be expected that you might still have pain and discomfort a few days after receiving your dentures. I would hope that by now (one month after getting your dentures), you find that you are feeling better. If not, you should return to the dentist who made your dentures to see if the dentures can be adjusted to fit better in your mouth. When dentures are placed the same day the teeth are extracted, it is normal to leave them in the mouth for 24 hours, even wearing them as you sleep. The dentures act like a bandage during the first day. When you visit the dentist who made your dentures the next day, the dentures will be removed and cleaned, sore spots relieved, and the bite adjusted. At that appointment you should have received instructions on caring for and cleaning your dentures. In general, you should remove your dentures every night, clean them thoroughly, and place them in a container with liquid denture cleanser or water to soak overnight. This not only prolongs the life of your dentures by keeping them free of stains and a buildup of bacteria, but it allows your gum tissues to rest and heal. In other words, you should now be taking your dentures out overnight.

Response provided by the American College of Prosthodontists.

Back to top

When I first got my top denture in 1976, my regular dentist told me to wear my dentures night and day (even when sleeping), which I continue to do. I got bottoms in 1991. I have the very same dentures today, and I contribute this longevity to Fixodent® and daily use. Am I correct? Do I not need to replace my dentures by using denture adhesive [link to https://dentureliving.com/en-us/shop-products/all-current] and keeping them in overnight?

Answer: It seems you have adapted extremely well to wearing dentures and have learned to compensate for the changes that have likely occurred in your many years of wearing dentures. Research shows that once the teeth are removed, the jaw bone shrinks and changes shape. Typically, dentures should be checked every year, and often they should be remade when they lose their fit and are loose in your mouth after five to 10 years of use. By using dental adhesive, you may have masked the loose fit of your dentures. Even though you have adapted to these dentures, you are not receiving the function and appearance you deserve. Also, it is important that you take your dentures out at night to allow your gum tissues to rest and to decrease the possibility of sore spots. You may want to seek the care of a prosthodontist, a dentist with three years of additional training beyond dental school in the restoration and replacement of teeth. To find a prosthodontist near you, visit www.gotoapro.org.

Response provided by the American College of Prosthodontists.

Back to top

When can you start taking out your new dentures overnight, when sleeping?

Answer: Your dental professionals will give you instructions about your denture that are specific for you. Typically, you will wear the denture for the first 24 hours and sleep with it in place for the first night. This allows the denture to act as a bandage. Usually the dentist who made the denture will see you the next day to adjust the bite and check the fit of the denture. For a number of days you will need to eat soft foods that are easy to chew. If you have not worn an upper partial, it may take you a few days to learn how to talk with something in the roof of your mouth—reading out loud helps your tongue adapt. It also takes a little time to get used to the denture touching the back of your palate. If you have any problems or concerns, please consult the dentist who made your denture.

Response provided by the American College of Prosthodontists.

Back to top